9 (Unusual) Ways to Make Money on Your Blog

Thanks for all the emails about the making money post last week.
You asked for a few more examples. Well, here they are.

make-money-online

9 (More) Ways to Make Money on Your Blog

Just one word of warning. Before you choose a product to sell online do as much research as possible. It’s very frustrating when you find that after setting up a site, selling some units, that your partner doesn’t pay up.
Ask around before you choose to invest you time. It will take a little effort but it’s worth doing. With that said, here are nine more…

  1. Music – When I created my first podcast I needed some background music and a jingle.  Where do you get these? Odesk is one option. Other companies have setup blogs offers royalty free music that you can add to your videos, podcast, and online shows. How hard can it be?
  2. Writing Templates – if you have writing skills, develop products for non-native english speakers or for specific industries. Here are templates for technical writers
  3. Voiceovers – Ever taken voice lessons? If you did, you can make money online doing screencasts, narrations, voiceovers, and tutorials. Want an example, listen to the intro to  Pat Flynn’s Smart Passive Income podcast.
  4. Membership Sites – This takes hard work but… offers HUGE rewards. Do the math. 100 members paying 49 USD per month. How about 500 paying $79? The question is who’d pay? Again, focus on the business sector, for example, energy, software, finance, research, government. Look at Jay and Sterling at Internet Business Mastery  and the Third Tribe.
  5. Mobile Apps – Again, link up with others on odesk and create an app that you can sell to mobile users. Don’t create another generic me-too product. Look for something magazines will want to review. This gives you the exposure and publicity you need to sell the product. Look at the iTunes store and see what products you could make better.
  6. Buy and Sell Sites – You can use sites like Flippa.com to sell do this. Be careful when you start. Learn the basics. Get as much information about the site’s performance, traffic, memberships and sales. Then place a bid. This process works very well is you understand the fundamentals of web business and are prepared to be patient. Don’t get burnt by paying too much. See what others are bidding and then proceed.
  7. Languages – While this market is saturated, look for ways to offer segmented courses or products. For example, teach American Born Chinese how to speak Shanghai-hua (the dialect spoken in Shanghai). Or teach the Scottish version of Gaelic. Most products are for the Irish version.
  8. Third Parties Software – Maybe the simplest way to make money. If you can get ‘quality’ traffic in sufficient numbers, then you can sell them software on behalf of others. For example, I sell Aweber, Method123, WhiteStorm software on different sites. If you have ANY experience of these areas, then you can use this to create posts, videos, cheat sheets, downloads and other content that drives traffic back to you site.
  9. Royalties – Use sites like Createspace, which is owned by Amazon, to upload music, videos and books you have written. You will be paid royalties on each sale; there are no setup costs.

You’ll notice that many of these involve selling other products. My suggestion is to try to sell products with a medium profit margin rather than real big hitter. Why?
The market is saturated with people trying to shift the very lucrative products. It’s a battlefield. Instead, step sideways and look at areas that are under-served. You’ll get much better returns in the long run.
What else did I miss?

Audience Analysis: Power Tools for Technical Writing

When discussing Audience Analysis, David McMurray points out that, “for most technical writers, this is the most important consideration in planning, writing, and reviewing a document. You “adapt” your writing to meet the needs, interests, and background of the readers who will be reading your writing.

Documents fail for many reasons. One common mistake is to adopt a ‘one size fits all’ approach to your audience. This works only when generic material, usually of a non-technical nature.
When discussing Audience Analysis, David McMurray points out that, “for most technical writers, this is the most important consideration in planning, writing, and reviewing a document. You “adapt” your writing to meet the needs, interests, and background of the readers who will be reading your writing. Continue reading “Audience Analysis: Power Tools for Technical Writing”

Paypal Survey Reveals Why Online Shoppers Abandon Purchases

A PayPal survey this week shows that 50% of online shoppers have abandoned their carts multiple times in the past three weeks due to high shipping costs, security concerns and lack of convenience. The average cost of abandoned goods in U.S. shopping carts is $109.

A PayPal survey this week shows that 50% of online shoppers have abandoned their carts multiple times in the past three weeks due to high shipping costs, security concerns and lack of convenience. The average cost of abandoned goods in U.S. shopping carts is $109.
Note: High Shipping Costs Top the List.
While nothing could have prevented one-third of shoppers from abandoning purchases, the survey found that providing shipping costs upfront might have caused 40 percent to complete the purchase.
To help merchants encourage shoppers to purchase, PayPal released a new Express Checkout feature – the PayPal Instant Update API.
By integrating the new API, merchants can show order details earlier in the process including shipping options, insurance choices and tax totals.
“To get shoppers to buy, it’s critical merchants make costs transparent,” said Eddie Davis, senior director of SMB merchant services, PayPal.
The survey also uncovered signs that the economy still has shoppers wary about clicking the “purchase” button.

  • 33% of respondents abandoned checkout because they didn’t plan for all of the expenses
  • 25% left the site to search for a coupon.
  • 33% later returned to the same site to buy.
  • 20% purchased the items at a brick and mortar store or competitor’s Web site.

“Merchants who don’t welcome back abandoners with open arms are leaving hundreds of dollars per shopper on the table,” added Davis.
“Sweetening the deal with free shipping, coupons and special discounts is also a great way to encourage online shoppers to complete their purchases.”


Breakdown on Why Shoppers Abandon
At least a fifth of all U.S. survey respondents cited the following as very important reasons for cart abandonment:

  • High shipping charges: 46 percent
  • Wanted to comparison shop: 37 percent
  • Lack of money: 36 percent
  • Wanted to look for a coupon: 27 percent
  • Wanted to shop offline: 26 percent
  • Couldn’t find preferred pay option: 24 percent
  • Item was unavailable at checkout: 23 percent
  • Couldn’t find customer support: 22 percent
  • Concerned about security of credit card data: 21 percent

About the survey
The PayPal Checkout Abandonment Study was conducted by comScore among active shoppers who had recently abandoned a shopping cart. In the United States 553 people participated between May 12-15, 2009.

Ivan Walsh is a technology writer based in Dublin, Ireland.
Learn how to save time, make money and develop digital products.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/ivanwalsh
Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/ivanwalsh
Ivan: www.ivanwalsh.com
Templates: www.mysoftwaretemplates.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/ivanwalsh

Posted via email from ivanwalsh’s posterous