How to Improve Top Performing Pages with Google Analytics

One mistake to avoid when you start selling online is to offer too many products. Try to focus your site around 3-5 products at most and you’ll have get sales. Ideally, your site should focus on your money pages. To identify your money pages, use the advanced features in Google Analytics.

google-analytics-identify-top-content

One mistake to avoid when you start selling online is to offer too many products. Try to focus your site around 3-5 products at most and you’ll have get sales. Ideally, your site should focus on your money pages. To identify your money pages, use the advanced features in Google Analytics.

Identify Money Pages with Google Analytics

To get a better understanding of your money pages, log into Google Analytics.

  • Select the blog/website you want to analyze.
  • Select a 3 month range so you get better picture of how your site/products have performed.
  • Select Top Content from the side menu.
  • Select the top 50 pages from the Show Rows at the bottom of the screen. This is more than enough to determine and optimize your top performing pages.
  • Select Percentage from the View option (far left of screen). This displays the top performing pages based on the percentage of traffic to the overall site. It’s also color-coded so you can identify the top pages faster.
  • Click on the Second most visited page. This opens the Content Detail page.

Note: your homepage is probably your most visited page. Ignore this for now and look at the other pages as these are pages your customers (and prospective customers) are interested in.

Drill Down into Google Analytics

You now want to examine a few stats:

  • How visitors found your content
  • Navigation Summary,  i.e. Entrance Paths visitors used to get to your content and where they go next
  • Entrance Sources per page
  • Entrance Keywords per page.

To do this, you need to look at the Navigation Summary:

  • Click Navigation Summary – this shows you the paths/pages visitors used to get to your content and where they go next.

This shows you the:

  • Percentage of Entrances
  • Percentage of Previous Pages
  • Percentage of Exits
  • Percentage of Next Pages

What you’re interested in is the Exits and Next Pages.
If you look at the Next Pages, you can see where they went next.
Did they go to your sales page?

Use this screen to examine where your customers are going and see what patterns emerge. For example, instead of going to the Buy Now page, they go to the About Us page.
That makes sense. They want to know who you are before they buy.
But, look at the About Us page in Google Analytics and see if they are going back to the Buy Now (salespages).
If they are not, then look at where they do and see how/where you can adjust these pages to return to the sales pages. Sometimes this is as simple as including a prominent link/button to the Sales page. Other times you need to be more creative.

Other Sales Stats to Examine

Once you get to know how Google Analytics works, look at the:

  • Path they take once they enter your money page
  • How long they stay on these pages
  • Where they leave the site

Tip: if you’re running an ecommerce site, or any site that sells things, the Exit page SHOULD be the page where they buy the product, right?
You’re trying to get them to the site, read about the product, and then hit the Buy Now button.

Use Excel to Filter Sales Data

You can export all the data in Google Analytics into Excel (and XML and PDF). I often do this as I know Excel fairly well and can create charts faster in here. It also lets me compare the data against data from other sites such as Google Adwords, AdSense and other site analytics software.
google-analytics-identify-top-pages-export-csv-excelTo do this:

  • At the top of the screen, click Export.
  • Select CSV for Excel from the submenu.
  • This downloads the stats to an Excel file you can examine when offline and /or data mine with Excel.

Next week, we’ll look at Entrance Keywords as these are the words, terms, and expressions that customers are using to land on your site. While the other information is useful, the keywords tell you what they are looking for and… how close your site/products meets their needs.
What other ways do you know for finding your money pages?

A Simple Four-Step Strategy for Developing Business Proposals That Work

It’s hard working in the dark, isn’t it? I’ve been looking at Business Proposals for a client all week (I assess Business Plans and Proposals as part of my consultancy services) and have found it very difficult to make a recommendation. Here’s the problem. The proposals are fine. They’re well-written. They look good. They have (almost) no grammar or typing errors. Even the prices are fine. So, what’s the problem?

It’s hard working in the dark, isn’t it? I’ve been looking at Business Proposals for a client all week (I assess Business Plans and Proposals as part of my consultancy services) and have found it very difficult to make a recommendation. Here’s the problem. The proposals are fine. They’re well-written. They look good. They have (almost) no grammar or typing errors. Even the prices are fine. So, what’s the problem?

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