How to Personalize Google's Search Engine

Eric flicked me an email about Google Adsense asking if it was worth the effort and what other alternative information products/services should he look at. Here’s an extract of the email I sent back.

Google Custom Search
Google Custom Search

~Hi Eric, thanks for the kind words. As you can imagine, it’s hard to know if you’re going in the right direction with a site like this, so every time I get a word of encouragement it gives me a little boost to continue.
I run a few other sites as well as this is/was designed to complement their offerings and also to act as a funnel for material that doesn’t suit elsewhere.
<I noticed you use Google AdSense. I’ve been reading up on it this week and trying to separate the reality from the mire of get rich quick schemes. How’s it working for you? Has it been worthwhile?

Using Google Custom Search To Increase Sales

Yes in the sense that is does work. If you can get a nice stream of traffic to your site, it will bring in revenue. But, to keep it in perspective, I get over 200k page impressions per month on the sites. This generates about 1k USD.

1,ooo USD  is fine but it takes a lot of effort to get 200k people to click around your sites every month.

I should add that I haven’t really tried to ‘optimize’ the site for Adsense as some webmasters do. The ads are there and if you want to click them, then it’s a bonus.
But, here’s a tip!
Looking at the stats, it’s the Search that generates the most revenue, not the ads themselves.
You can create a Google Search box, link it to your Adsense account, and use this as a way to encourage visitors to surf around your site.
And here’s an even better tip!
You can configure the Google Search box so that it searches specific sites only. See www.google.com/cse

How Google Custom Search Works

You can setup Google Custom Search to create a customized search experience for your own website.

  • Include one or more websites, or specific webpages
  • Host the search box and results on your own website
  • Customize the look and feel of the results to match your site
  • Provide fast and relevant search results
  • Make money with AdSense for Search
  • Automatically search across links, bookmarks or blogrolls
  • Control branding and enhance results presentation via XML results
  • Provide quick indexing of your website via On-Demand indexing
  • Embed a Custom Search Element into your website for a highly customized in-line search experience.

In other words, you can limit the search to your site and other sites that you specifically want the visitor to go to, such as affiliate sites or partner sites (you could link up with a similar site and arrange cross-searching).
With that said, it does take time to master Adsense, but if you have a long-term strategy, yes it is worthwhile.
I’d recommend using the Adsense plug-ins you can get for WordPress as these help automate the process. Real time-saver.
Why?
Because other areas are much more profitable!
Such as?

Example of Reliable Affiliate Programs

Method123 have been a winner for us from day 1. There a lot of sites offering affiliate/partner programs but this is absolute gold dust!
Their site is right when it says:

  • Our Affiliate program differs from others because:
  • We are a profitable company and only do business over the web
  • We offer large affiliate commissions
  • Our average sales amount is extremely high
  • Our conversion rate is also high

So, if can write articles about project management or anything to do with running projects, then you can link to their site, drive traffic over and claim your commission.
Things you could write about might be:

  • 10 ways to improve your Business Case
  • Learn how to write a Feasibility Study in 24 hours
  • What you need a Project Charter
  • 7 Ways to develop a Project Office Checklist

It’s pretty straightforward. I use other affiliate programs, such as GoDaddy, aWeber and Paypal. They’re all fine but Method123 has worked very well for me.
FYI – their head office is in New Zealand and you get that nice feeling that you’re working with a real company whereas with other programs you get an auto-responder back and then a relationship manager after a few days.
Darren Rowse has a great article if you’re thinking of getting into problogging.
Before I forget, Amazon has been a total time-waster. When I consider the effort v the results I got back – avoid!
I know others recommend it but if you apply yourself and find a 2 or 3 quality affiliate programs, you’ll do much better.

The Mythical One Page Business Plan

A One Page Business Plan is more useful than you’d think. I was a bit sceptical about writing a one page business plan until my client twisted my arm to write it. I’d wanted to write a more in- depth document or use Business Plan software to scope out the requirements. As an experiment we tried it.

A One Page Business Plan is more useful than you’d think. I was a bit skeptical about writing a one page business plan until my client twisted my arm to write it. I’d wanted to write a more in- depth document or use Business Plan software to scope out the requirements. As an experiment we tried it. Here’s what I learned.

One Page Business Plan: Where’s the real benefit?

Writing a one-page business plan helps the small business owner focus on the main components that make up the company.

The Mythical One Page Business Plan

Difference Between One Page Business Plan and Traditional Business Plans

The difference between a one page business plan and traditional business plans (e.g. MS Word templates) is that:

  • A one one-page business plan is not a replacement for your strategic planning documents.
  • A one one-page business plan is not meant to provide in-depth analysis of your business model. How could it?
  • A one one-page business plan is not used to seek finance, for example, from your local bank manager or investors. But, there may be exceptions…
  • A one one-page business plan gives you a snapshot of the key points in your business
  • A one one-page business plan is a framework upon which you can start to build a more comprehensive document outlining your Strategic Plan, Marketing Plan, Technology roadmap, and Training & Development needs, Costs, and Personnel
  • A one one-page business plan provides direction for the future growth of your business. It’s a finger pointing in the right direction and

[Video] One Page Business Plan: Example of How It Works

In this video, we look at some of the differences between one-page business plans and the larger documents, for example, Business Plans in Microsoft Word format that you can format to suit your needs.

One Page Business Plan: Who Uses It

What I learned from this exercise is that – if you approach it with the right attitude – you can use this as a stepping stone for more in-depth analysis. The upside is that you get a ‘business plan document’ written in less than a day, while the downside it that it’s a snapshot and needs to be fleshed out if you decide to push ahead with the project.

So, who can benefit from this?

I can see the following benefiting from this:

  • Business Units
  • Cost Centers
  • Cross-functional teams
  • Departments
  • Divisions
  • Government Agencies
  • Not-for-profits
  • Profit Centers
  • Programs
  • Projects
  • Startup Companies
  • Subsidiaries

There are others but you get the idea.

One Page Business Plan: Why It’s Not a Plan

It’s a way to get your business planning up and running quickly and start to explore market strategies quickly.

But, it’s not a plan in the traditional sense. You can’t use this to develop a framework for your marketing plans or use it to seek funding.

There is an upside though. It does allow you to get a quick snapshot of how the business model may work and use this to refine gaps in the process or identify areas where the business plan needs more attention.

Why You Should Write a One Page Business Plan

A one one-page business plan grows with the business. As you change, so to does the business plan.

One final thing. The name of the document is irrelevant. You can call it what you want.

The real purpose of the one-page business plan is to help you navigate the choppy waters of running your business. Keep it simple. Make it useful. Keep it up to date!

What do you think?

Do Tough Bosses Reap What They Sow?

Who’s The Toughest Boss in the US? You see these headlines in business magazines all the time. But what interesting from a business perspective is not Who but Why? Does a tough love boss generate better results that a compassionate one? Do all cultures use this as their yardstick when judging CEOs and leaders?

Who’s The Toughest Boss in the US? You see these headlines in business magazines all the time. But what interesting from a business perspective is not Who but Why? Does a tough love boss generate better results that a compassionate one? Do all cultures use this as their yardstick when judging CEOs and leaders?

tough-boss

Why We Champion Tough Bosses

Before we assess their performance, we need to examine for a moment why we do this. Indeed, maybe it’s the way we champion ‘tough’ bosses rather than looking at ways to bring people together is our fault.

Personally, I find something very odd about this tendency to admire managers who make aggression their calling card as opposed to say… creativity, innovation, or motivation.

One needs to balance the carrot and the stick but surely it’s the results that count.

Seeing Both Sides makes this point when reading Jack Welch’s columns in Business Week, called “The Welch Way”.  In “Tough Guys Finish First” Welch writes in answer to the question, “Do tough bosses really get more out of their people?”, a simple answer:  “yes”. 

He argues that the right boss is tough as in tough-minded: 

“They set clear, challenging goals. They connect those goals with specific expectations. They conduct frequent, rigorous performance reviews. They are relentlessly candid, letting everyone know where they stand and how the business is doing. Every single day, good tough bosses stretch people. They ask for a lot, and they expect to get it…Weak performers usually wish these bosses would go away. People who want to win seek them out.”

I’m included to agree with Jack but… it’s how one goes about this is the issue at least in the office.

  1. Connect goals with specific expectations – the key word here is specific. Poor managers are (deliberately?) vague or unable to define goals in specific terms. I heard one boss complain that he ‘felt’ his line manager wasn’t performing well. How do you answer that?
  2. Relentlessly candid – the key here is to be forthright but not scathing or derogatory of others efforts. My personal feeling is that people want to do the right thing but sometimes they screw up. We all do. It’s how mgt react to this that needs addressing. I’ve seen people torn apart in meetings for relatively minor mistakes. You can imagine how this affects their long term performance not to mention their self confidence.
  3. People who want to win seek them out – A good example of this is in Sports where players will endure the Coach if their performance improves under their guidance.

Are you a part of the problem?

Jerry Roberts asks the question no-one wants to ask, “Could you be contributing to the stress? Are you just an innocent bystander here, or have you done your share to fan the flames of discontent? Are you meeting stated expectations and do you do everything you can to strengthen the team?”

He adds, ‘When I stopped seeing my boss as good or bad and focused on what I could control — whether they viewed me as an asset or liability — things got a lot simpler.” He outlines five great ways to survive your tough boss here.

Tim Berry reminds us that “occasionally you hear about a coach who is either hard or soft to each individual player, depending on his sense of how that specific player responds. There too, though, with coaching, it’s a pretty complex problem, because it’s about the nature of the coach, the nature of the player, and the nature of the situation.”

Conclusion

Tough bosses have come to us from the Industrial Age where bosses behaved as tyrants and humiliated employees on a whim. In today’s ‘knowledge worker’ economy, employees are looking for direction, for ways to advance their career and move from ‘worker bees’ to creators.

Tough as in committed is admirable; tough as in abusive is… counter-productive.

How do you see bosses moving from a ‘command and control’ philosophy to one that helps their teams contribute to their firm’s success?

Image: noel tanner

5 Business Plan Mistakes to Avoid

The importance of business planning is widely documented; however, guidance as to what constitutes good business planning is less clearly defined. This article aims to redress that imbalance by describing 5 of the most common mistakes that occur in business plans.

The importance of business planning is widely documented; however, guidance as to what constitutes good business planning is less clearly defined. This article aims to redress that imbalance by describing 5 of the most common mistakes that occur in business plans.

business-plan-tips

While the business-planning process is in itself a very worthwhile exercise, most business plans are produced for a specific purpose. The plan is used as a means to convey an idea with a view to achieving a specific goal, e.g. securing funding.

Hence the plan needs to be tailored with the audience in mind, and good knowledge of their requirements will help shape a winning plan.

For example, the requirements a Venture Capitalist will have in assessing a plan where the author of it is seeking to secure a million-pound investment will differ considerably from those of a local bank manager who reviews a plan in support of a small-loan application.

While the former will be primarily looking for capital growth, the latter will be more concerned with security. To ensure you give yourself the best chance of being successful with your business plan it is important that the following common mistakes are avoided.

1. Incredible financial projections

One of the key areas business plan readers will focus on will be ‘the numbers’. Specifically, they will concentrate on the projected Income Statement or Profit & Loss.

The fact that numbers are projected does not mean that those figures can be included without due rigour or process. They need to be credible, defensible and consistent.

Of course forecasting is not an exact science, and the use of proxies can help the author ensure that the figures included are consistent with the story being told in the other areas of the business plan.

The figures must also show an ability of the company to generate free cash flows so that the business can be run profitably while satisfactorily servicing their debts at the same time.

All costs should be recorded including salaries to owner managers who run the company. It is not credible to generate P&L projections where expenses such as salaries are omitted to demonstrate managerial commitment or to artificially reduce losses, etc.

By the same token, no investor will be prepared to fund a business where the projected salary payments are excessive. While dealing with finances is not everyone’s strong point, there has to be someone on the management team who is cognizant with the maths.

A business plan will need to include everything from break-even projections to proposed return on investments to cash flow forecasts, and one of the key players will have to converse on these subjects in a convincing manner. They will also need to justify the numbers.

2. Not writing a clear business plan

A business plan needs to not only describe an opportunity, it must also detail how the opportunity can be exploited profitably and demonstrate the company’s ability to deliver what is required.

In recent years there has been a significant increase in plans that are inaccessible to the average reader because they are couched in technical jargon and unfamiliar terms.

If the reader of the plan cannot fully grasp who the prospective customer is, how that customer will be targeted, and the prospective benefits from the proposed solution, the reader will not invest. In an increasingly time-pressed world, people crave simplicity.

Many business plan recipients will only scrutinize the Executive Summary and the financials, using these as the decision points as to whether to read further or not. Hence it is of paramount importance that both the executive summary and the wider plan describes the opportunity in readily understood terms, such as:

  • What is the issue or pain point?
  • What is the proposed solution?
  • What are the benefits of the solution?
  • Why are these benefits compelling?
  • Who will benefit the most from these?

Once these are detailed, there will be greater transparency regarding the viability, or otherwise, of the proposed opportunity in terms of the company’s ability to profitably serve the target market.

3. No clear route to market

All opportunities are only ‘prospective ones’ without evidence that the target market can be accessed profitably. Many entrepreneurs are inherently product focused, concentrating their energies on ‘the idea’ to the exclusion of many other important elements such as how they intend to access their customer base.

The growth in popularity of the Internet has certainly helped niche producers find geographically dispersed customers, making many more ideas commercially viable. However, it does not come without its challenges, as creating awareness online is both costly and intensely competitive.

The business plan must include a comprehensive and credible analysis of how the company intends to secure access to their target market in a cost-effective manner. The low cost and barriers to entry for websites have resulted in the creation of hundreds of thousands of sites.

Ensuring that a site stands out from the crowd is easier said than done. Knowledge of who the customer is and how they buy is very important, but identifying them and accessing them on an individual basis is much more challenging and costly.

Your business plan needs a detailed marketing plan which identifies who your customers are and how you intend to market and sell to them in a cost effective manner.

4. No clear objective

What is the main purpose of the plan? If it is to seek investment in the business, it is important to clearly describe the investment opportunity and set out what you require up front. As mentioned previously there is a tendency amongst entrepreneurs to focus myopically on ‘the product‘ or ‘the idea‘.

This is where they expend most energy but alas that is only one part of the process. While the plan describes the concept in detail, it must also address the purpose of the plan. If it is to secure investment, one needs to recognize that investing is the investor’s area of expertise and they will be seeking an appropriate risk/ return for their investment.

Their primary interest will quickly shift from the product once they ‘get it‘ and ‘like it‘ to assessing the ability of the company (including management) to generate free cash flows to enable the business to grow while also returning cash to them. They will also seek to understand:

  • Why they would be better off investing in this business rather than leaving money in other asset classes?
  • When will they recoup their initial investment?
  • What is their expected return on investment?
  • Is the investment merely cash or do they need to bring additional things to the table?

Once the primary objective of the plan is clear, the author will be able to ensure that the key requirements of
the reader are met. Hence you need to state explicitly what you want and what the investor will get in return (typically stated as ‘I need £1 million in return for X% of my business’).

5. No evidence of real demand

Another main area of interest when planning is justifying the sales forecast or demand levels for the product or service.

There are two main elements to forecasting – the use of facts and the use of subjective assessment/ judgment.

However, no matter how unique a concept is, if the market is defined widely enough, it is likely that figures from alternative offerings (facts) can be used to help assess likely demand levels (judgment).

The aim of sales forecasting is to come up with some revenue figures that can be considered to be credible in the wider context. While earlier we countenanced against excessively optimistic estimates, here we are delving deeper to ensure there is, in fact, real demand for the offering.

Prospective investors will not want to invest at the very start where the risk is highest. Is there poof of concept in the guise of sales or firm orders? Have some sales occurred already? If not, why not?

Unless there is verifiable demand for the idea, the risks grow out of all proportion, particularly if the initial start-up or investment costs are high. Is it possible to test the idea in real time, either by identifying comparables in other geographic areas or analyzing Google search logs or selling via eBay?

Again the business plan has to convincingly address the issue of demand rather than concentrate in isolation on ‘the idea’.

For some investors, firm orders or evidence of sales will be the level of proof required and allusions to proxies or comparables will not be sufficient. Conversely if there are already strong sales volumes of the product and the company is facing financing or resource constraints which have forced them to seek investment, then the power shifts from the investor to the plan author.

Summary and conclusion

In summary, business plans generally have a purpose of communicating a course of action so as to garner support for the plan. Support inevitably means resources, with the primary aim of the plan often being to secure financial investment.

With this comes a certain obligation on the business plan author to ensure that the plan is prepared in as thorough a manner as is possible. By ensuring the above mistakes are avoided, the chances of the plan objectives being met increase substantially.

About the Author

Alan Gleeson, Managing Director of Palo Alto Software Ltd, creators of Business Plan Pro This is a guest post by Alan Gleeson, Managing Director of Palo Alto Software Ltd, creators of Business Plan Pro. He holds an MBA from Oxford University and an MSc from University College, Cork, Ireland and has been writing on entrepreneurship and business planning for a number of years.

This article originally appeared on BPlans.co.uk

What Al Pacino Taught Me About Corporate Culture

I interviewed three people during the week. All were well-educated, articulate, and qualified.
But something was eating at me.
If you (20-something) are coming to an interview with me (45 year old) remember…


Creative Commons License photo credit: Chris Barber
‘Don’t wear jeans. You’re not going to a rodeo.’ Al Pacino give snitching Johnny Depp a lesson in dress code.
In Donnie Brasco, Pacino is an aging mafioso wise-guy who takes Depp under his wing. Like any rookie coming into an organization, he needs to teach him the ropes. And this kid knows nothing.
Lose the mustache. Ditch the wallet. Wise guys keep dollar bills in a tight roll so they can peel them out.
and no Jeans…
The Mafia has it’s own dress code. Dress for business because the street is your shop floor. So, all the wise-guys look like businessmen.

Where Smart Casual Goes Wrong

This brings us nicely to smart casual. Or ‘smart caj’ as they say.
I interviewed three people during the week. All were well-educated, articulate, and qualified.
But something was eating at me.
If you (20-something) are coming to an interview with me (45 year old) remember…

  • This is a business meeting.
  • Don’t get too familiar too fast. – you can call me Ivan if you want. But a Mr or Sir never hurt.
  • Sneakers – You can wear sneakers. But dress shoes would be better. Oh yeah, if they are snickers, make sure they’re clean, with laces, and the laces are tied.
  • Beer – we met on Friday. I knew the second guy was out drinking the night before. That’s fine but… I don’t want to share that stale odor at 10 am on a Friday.
  • Be clean – remember to wash. I’ll say it again. Remember to wash.
  • Cut your nails. I’ll only say it once.
  • Be on time – don’t look desperate by arriving an hour early. Arrive 5 minutes early and we’re ready to start. You can freshen up in the restrooms if you want. Give yourself some extra time if the place is new to you. Don’t be afraid to ask for directions.
  • Ask questions – I want to learn what you’re made of. The questions you ask tells me  about your hopes, interests, fears, ambitions… why you’re here.
  • Curveballs – Get ready to answer them. Get ready for the standard questions and then assume I’ll throw some curve balls. ‘That’s not fair’. Maybe not, but life’s not fair. Get used to it and learn to deal with the unexpected.
    Why? How you cope with the unexpected is something I can’t see on your CV. It show me how you copy with stress and will handle difficult clients.
  • Samples – you know I want to see your work, right? Bring the best samples, print them out and walk me through what makes these special. You want your work to stand out otherwise…
  • Respect – Don’t diss your ex-employee. I don’t expect you to work with me forever. When you move on, I want you to have enjoyed working together and say nice things about me to other clients.
  • Listen as much as you talk – I know you’re nervous. You want the job. I have the job. But don’t let your nerves tangle you in knots. Remember to breath. Stay calm. Sip your water. Give others space to talk. Listen. Make notes. Ask sensible questions.
  • Bring a pen, make notes. Don’t rely on the laptop. One guy’s died during the interview. He also couldn’t look at me when typing as he kept correcting his typo mistakes. Use a pad, makes short notes. Look interested.

Take the Long View With Relationships

See this as first of many meetings. If things go well, we’ll meet again. And, even if we don’t assume that we’ll meet again.
It happens all the time in business. So, turn up on time, be clean, listen as much as you talk and remember to smile.
One final thing about interviews.
Always follow-up. Leave a nice message the next day thanking the person for taking the time to meet you. Others won’t.
What have I missed?
What mistakes do people make during interviews? What do you do before interviews that I haven’t covered here?

Steve Jobs: How to Define A Succession Plan For

It’s a cliché. No one is bigger than the team. But, in the case of Apple, it’s the other way round. No one is bigger than Steve. And when Steve goes… Let’s look at how Apple is creating a Succession Plan for Steve Jobs and what mistakes it needs to avoid.

It’s a cliché. No one is bigger than the team. But, in the case of Apple, it’s the other way round. No one is bigger than Steve. And when Steve goes… Let’s look at how Apple is creating a Succession Plan for Steve Jobs and what mistakes it needs to avoid. Continue reading “Steve Jobs: How to Define A Succession Plan For”

Business Planning: Shrink the Change and Get It Finished

One myth about writing Business Plans is that they’re hard. Not true. They’re very hard to do right. But before you hit the Back button, here is one way you can get it written it, with a lot less pain than you’d expect.

One myth about writing Business Plans is that they’re hard. Not true. They’re very hard to do right. But before you hit the Back button, here is one way you can get it written it, with a lot less pain than you’d expect. Continue reading “Business Planning: Shrink the Change and Get It Finished”

The Jeff Bezos Regret Minimization Framework

I preferred to avoid risks, especially big ones, until I saw this short video by Jeff Bezos. In less than four minutes he changed my perspective on how to take risks and have more confidence in your decisions.

I preferred to avoid risks, especially big ones, until I saw this short video by Jeff Bezos. In less than four minutes he changed my perspective on how to take risks and have more confidence in your decisions.
He describes the framework he uses to deal with risk-taking and gives examples of how you can apply this approach to your life.

[Video] Jeff Bezos & Risks Assessment

How to use the Regret Minimization Framework?

Like most great things, it’s very simple. If you have trouble making a decision, for example, leaving a high paid job with all the nice perks to start up a business, then you can use this framework.
After all, this is the way he justified his decision to himself when starting Amazon.
We’ll come back to justification later on but, for now, keep it in mind.

Regret Minimization Framework

To reduce the fear you have of taking a risk, try this:

  • Imagine you are now at the end of your life, about 80.
  • You look back on all you have done and all you have NOT done.
  • You regret certain things you did, for example, hurting others and causing them pain.
  • BUT you deeply regret NOT doing things when you had the time, energy, and opportunity to do so.

As we age, it’s what we COULD have done but did not that hurts the most. Other things we accept as they were part of growing up, maturing or things beyond our control.
Think about this…
Ask yourself, at the end of my life, would I regret not taking the chance to setup the business (when you really felt it would work)?
Chances are you’d regret it deeply. You won’t regret that you didn’t make enough money, or had a bigger car, or wore fancy clothes but you would regret not doing what you felt was part of your calling.
Others might call this your destiny, vocation, fate, talent… it doesn’t matter what you label it as. It was something you felt you could achieve and you let the opportunity go. That will hurt if you don’t take it.
Bezos assessed his life and decided that he could forgive himself for many things but this business (Amazon.com) had to happen. He didn’t want to meet himself later in life and have to justify his (lack of) decision.
and…
Taking a long-term view allows us to stop thinking about the mundane daily worries that clog our thinking.
By reviewing our lives from a future place (eg as an 80 year old looking looking backwards), we’re removed from the little things that distract us.
The other side of this is how we justify this decision to ourselves.

How We Justify Things

Another way of looking at this is how we justify our decisions.
Look at how you justify things you buy.

I often disguise my true motives with loftier aims. For example, I bought an iPad because I wanted to be in the loop. Like a small child, everyone else had one, so I wanted one.

The justification was… this is an education tool/I can learn how to monetize my business with this/my kids will learn things with it.

When I go on expensive holidays, I can justify it be pointing to all the hard work I put in over the year. But, at the back of my mind, I simply feel that I deserved it. Explaining that to other can be tricky, awkward, and embarrassing depending on who you’re talking to.

Conclusion

Emotions often drive our decisions: we use logical arguments to justify the outcomes.
We can reduce our fear of Risks if we fast forward to the end of our days and revise these decisions. From that place, what seems like a risk to us now, appears almost irrelevant.
Why would you not take the risk?
I would urge you to watch the video and see if you agree with what Mr Bezos has to say. His arguments are very compelling.
Let me know what you think.

Teaching Business Skills to 9 Year Old Child Entrepreneurs

I asked the little kid if he wanted to know how I made money. He said Yes. ‘It’s called Google Adsense. It’s real simple…’
Parents who run their own business want to share what they’ve learnt with their children. You want what’s best for them, what you didn’t have growing up. In short, a better life. Did your parents explain to you how to run a business? Ever wish they had? Even secretly?

I asked the little kid if he wanted to know how I made money. He said Yes. ‘It’s called Google Adsense. It’s real simple…’
Parents who run their own business want to share what they’ve learnt with their children. You want what’s best for them, what you didn’t have growing up. In short, a better life. Did your parents explain to you how to run a business? Ever wish they had? Even secretly? Continue reading “Teaching Business Skills to 9 Year Old Child Entrepreneurs”

Are Virtual Assistants 21st Century Slaves?

I blame Tim Ferris.
Today I will exploit six single mothers in three different counties. And tomorrow I’ll do the same. I use Virtual Assistants. And in some people’s eyes, this has become a modern day slavery trade driven by the demon Internet.
Tim, who as an Irish Hurling Champion can’t be all bad, wrote the best-seller Four Hour Work Week, which is the definitive guide for outsourcing your life. Here’s how it works.

I blame Tim Ferris.
Today I will exploit six single mothers in three different counties. And tomorrow I’ll do the same. I use Virtual Assistants. And in some people’s eyes, this has become a modern day slavery trade driven by the demon Internet.
Tim, who as an Irish Hurling Champion can’t be all bad, wrote the best-seller Four Hour Work Week, which is the definitive guide for outsourcing your life. Here’s how it works.
Continue reading “Are Virtual Assistants 21st Century Slaves?”